Statistics

Extreme heat poses a billion-dollar threat to Australia’s economy

"...heat stress probably cost the Australian economy nearly A$7 billion in 2013-2014 through productivity losses..."

Regardless of the reason, productivity loss from heat was a major cost to the Australian economy in 2014. Of 1,726 respondents sampled randomly from the Australian population, 7% did not go to work on at least one day in the previous 12 months because of heat stress.

Ten times that number (70%) went to work but thought they were less efficient. On average people were less productive at work because they felt heat stressed on 10 days per year and cumulatively also lost about 27 hours per year. When the sample is extrapolated to the Australian working population, heat stress costs the nation A$6.9 billion per year in lost productivity.

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The Heat is On: What Employers Can Do to Protect Employees from Heat-Related Illness

"OSHA has stepped up its focus on and enforcement, citing employers for failing to properly protect workers from heat-related illnesses, including issuing willful citations with a proposed penalty of $70,000 in some cases."

As a cold winter finally comes to an end, many of us look forward to summertime warmth. But sun and heat can spell danger for workers who are exposed to soaring temperatures and a rising heat index. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”), thousands of workers in the United States get sick from excessive heat exposure while working outdoors each year and more than 30 workers died in 2012 from heat-related illnesses.

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The Deadliest High School Sports

"Every year, at least 10 children die from heat stroke during a sports game or practice, according to data from the National Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research."

Slightly cooler weather means fall, which means the return of football.

Although fans always embrace a new football season, some parents of high school athletes might fear the sport’s return.

The country's most dangerous high school sport in terms of the sheer number of injuries is being blamed for the death of a 14 year old boy in Anaheim, Calif., according to the Associated Press. The cause of the injury is unknown, but late summer football deaths are typically because of heat stroke. Every year, at least 10 children die from heat stroke during a sports game or practice, according to the data from the National Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research. Dozens more suffer from heat stroke or heat exhaustion on the field.

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Safety for Laborers

"...heat exhaustion can become heat stroke, which has killed - on average - more than 30 workers annually since 2003."

ATLANTA -- The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration, along with trade associations and employers throughout Georgia, Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee will conduct a one-hour safety stand-down at construction sites and workplaces on Tuesday, June 4, to raise awareness about the dangers of working in the summer heat. Workers will voluntarily stop work from 7 to 8 a.m. EDT to conduct safety training focused on the symptoms of heat-related illnesses and preventive steps to take while working in the hot weather.

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